Exploring the Amazing Borobudur in Java

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Boro-budur meaning great Buddha in local language, is both a shrine to Lord Buddha and a place of Buddhist pilgrimage to Asians.

The monument is placed in the sacred Kedu plains, a high fertile area dubbed as the ‘garden of Java’. This elevated area is between two volcanoes SundoroSumbing and MerbabuMerapi, and two rivers, the Progo and the Elo.

To witness the sunrise at this amazing temple in the heart of Java is to be living a dream. Coming into view of the statue of Buddha seated cross legged inside a perforated stupa I was enjoying that dream. A dozen other stupas scattered in circles on top are identical, but only one has the walls coming up half way allowing us to view the serene face of the Buddha etched in molten rock. Through the diamond shaped openings on the sides of the many stupas I could view the statues found inside.

The views are amazing from the top – large expanse of open plains surrounded by emerald jungles. Volcanic mountains peak and pale blue rivers meander like brush strokes. The mist is rising in thin strands like steam to meet a warm glowing sun.  The dome or peak of the temple is not very large. It sits on top of three circular rings that conforms to Buddhist cosmology and nine stacked platforms.

The temple is in pyramid form closely resembling ancient Mayan temples found in South America. The temple is said to be decorated with 2,672 relief panels and 504 Buddha statues. The relief panels demonstrate the influences of Gupta art that reflects India’s influence on the region. Yet there are enough indigenous scenes and elements incorporated to make Borobudur uniquely Indonesian.

I proceeded up following a set of steep steps to reach a different platform. Walking along the corridors I followed the trail of a story the craftsmen had etched. Plump figures in the reliefs sculptured in minute detail show strands of pearls around their necks, thick anklets on their dancing feet, women fanning the royals and men standing guard. The stories are related to the life of Buddha. A few stories are on Javanese royalty belonging to that period and the peasant workers who pleased them.

Reaching about the fifth platform I was pleasantly surprised to find young children flying tiny kites in the wind. Entire families come here on a day outing. I heard that Javanese people journey to Borobudur atleast once in a lifetime.  The elderly with bowed heads and pious hearts make it a pilgrimage in hope of reaching inner peace. The young quick and light on their feet, the children in a playful riot and the seniors helped by others – all reach the dome

The Borobudur has entered the Guinness Book of Records as the World’s largest Buddhist archeological site. Built in the 9th century during the reign of the Sailendra Dynasty, the temple is designed in Javanese Buddhist architecture and laid in the form of a Mandalaya.  Evidence suggest that the temple complex was abandoned in 14th century during the decline of Hindu kingdom.

The honour of discovering this great monument goes to Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, then the British ruler of Java (1814). Borobudur has since been preserved through several restorations. The largest restoration project was undertaken between 1975 and 1982 by the Indonesian government and UNESCO, following which the monument was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

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